Leah Kronenberg's Allegories of Farming from Greece and Rome: Philosophical PDF

By Leah Kronenberg

ISBN-10: 0521517265

ISBN-13: 9780521517263

During this publication Professor Kronenberg indicates that Xenophon's Oeconomicus, Varro's De Re Rustica and Virgil's Georgics usually are not easily works on farming yet belong to a practice of philosophical satire which makes use of allegory and irony to query the that means of morality. those works metaphorically attach farming and its similar arts to political lifestyles; yet rather than providing farming in its conventional guise as a favorable image, they use it to version the deficiencies of the energetic existence, which in flip is juxtaposed to a popular contemplative lifestyle. even if those 3 texts should not often handled jointly, this e-book convincingly connects them with an unique and provocative interpretation in their allegorical use of farming. It additionally fills a huge hole in our realizing of the literary impacts at the Georgics through exhibiting that it really is formed not only via its poetic predecessors yet by way of philosophical discussion.

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During this e-book Professor Kronenberg exhibits that Xenophon's Oeconomicus, Varro's De Re Rustica and Virgil's Georgics usually are not easily works on farming yet belong to a practice of philosophical satire which makes use of allegory and irony to question the that means of morality. those works metaphorically attach farming and its comparable arts to political lifestyles; yet rather than proposing farming in its conventional guise as a favorable image, they use it to version the deficiencies of the energetic lifestyles, which in flip is juxtaposed to a popular contemplative lifestyle.

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Extra info for Allegories of Farming from Greece and Rome: Philosophical Satire in Xenophon, Varro, and Virgil

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See also Salvatore (1978) (see 55 nn. 1–4 for a bibliography on the subject through 1978), Leach (1981), Ross (1987) 32–33, 28–39, 235–37, Thomas (1987), Thomas (1988) passim, Farrell (1991) 155–57, and Baier (1997) 147–64. g. Schultz [1911] and Engelke [1912]), there is a general consensus today that the De Re Rustica left a deep imprint on the Georgics, Introduction 33 1 (155–57), but concludes, “in the Georgics, the Varronian material, to say nothing yet of the Aratean, occurs in what is manifestly an overarching contextual allusion to Works and Days” (156).

4). In his De Senectute, Cicero’s Cato runs through the traditional stories about early Roman farmer-heroes such as Manius Curius and Quinctius Cincinnatus (Sen. 56). On the moral connotations of farming, see also the initial section of this introduction. Introduction 23 My allegorical readings of Xenophon, Varro, and Virgil fit in with approaches which interpret farming (or household management) in a symbolic manner but which also draw on the symbolism that these activities already possessed in Greek and Roman culture.

As Hundert (1994) notes, the Augustan moralists were fiercely opposed to “vices” like greed and luxury, and “[f]or the Augustans, the primary language of political opposition engaged a vocabulary that opposed virtue to corruption, the dignity of landed to mobile property, and public service to self-interest” (9). 86 While there were many differences between the moral and political climates of Mandeville’s England and the Greece and Rome of Xenophon, Varro, and Virgil, there were also some interesting similarities that provide further possible connections between these writers’ political and moral allegories.

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Allegories of Farming from Greece and Rome: Philosophical Satire in Xenophon, Varro, and Virgil by Leah Kronenberg


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